Inductees

 

Judy Collins

INDUCTED

November 8, 2013

Judy Collins claims Colorado as her home state, as her family moved from Seattle to Denver in 1949, when she was 10. Her father was a singer, composer and broadcasting personality, and she appeared as a youngster on his KOA radio program, Chuck Collins Calling. Shortly after arriving in Colorado, Collins began the study of classical piano with Dr. Antonia Brico, and she debuted with the Denver Businessmen’s Orchestra when she was just a teenager.

Serendipity Singers

INDUCTED

November 8, 2013

The folk boom of the early 1960s spawned numerous purveyors of well-scrubbed folk-pop, and one of the most popular ensembles was a mixed-gender nine-member group founded at the University of Colorado. The Serendipity Singers created a unique sound with the use of several guitars, banjos, bass fiddles and drums, and virtually every member sang. Two trios, the Harlin Trio and the Mark III, had organized at the Delta Tau Delta house and made a name in Boulder.

Bob Lind

INDUCTED

November 8, 2013

While not a Colorado native, Bob Lind called the state home. He graduated from high school in Aurora and enrolled at Western State College in Gunnison, where he focused on playing guitar to the exclusion of academics. He dropped out circa 1964 and moved to Denver, where he became immersed in the folk music scene and took coffeehouses such as the Exodus, the Green Spider and the Analyst by storm. One night, he wrote a song—“Elusive Butterfly.”

Chris Daniels

INDUCTED

November 8, 2013

A Minnesota teen inspired by folk music and acoustic blues, Chris Daniels settled in Colorado in 1971 and joined Magic Music, one of the first acoustic jam bands. Magic Music performed at the second and third Telluride Bluegrass Festivals in 1975 and 1976, held its own in local clubs and was often booked at Boulder’s the Good Earth with the funky Freddi-Henchi Band. After leaving the area to earn a college degree, he returned to found Spoons, a country-rock band.

The Astronauts

INDUCTED

September 8, 2012

Circa 1962, the Astronauts played rock 'n' roll and R&B hits of the day around the University of Colorado campus. RCA Victor wanted a surf group of their own to compete with the Beach Boys. So even though the landlocked group had never played surf music, the classic Astronauts lineup—Rich Fifield, Dennis Lindsey and Bob Demmon on guitars, Jon Storm Patterson on bass and drummer Jim Gallagher—ended up with a long-term recording contract.

Sugarloaf

INDUCTED

September 8, 2012

The end of the 1960s set the stage for Sugarloaf, as the cream of several Denver bands came together as Chocolate Hair. Keyboardist/vocalist Jerry Corbetta and guitarist Bob Webber of the Moonrakers (Denver's most popular group during the middle of the decade), plus Bob Raymond on bass and Myron Pollock on drums, recorded demos that got Chocolate Hair signed to Liberty Records.

Flash Cadillac

INDUCTED

September 8, 2012

Flash Cadillac & the Continental Kids formed at the University of Colorado in 1968 as an oldies alternative to the rock sound. Lewd and rude shows at Tulagi quickly became the biggest events in Boulder. One year later, the band drove to Los Angeles to play the legendary Troubadour. Flash Cadillac came on last to a half-empty club and soon had the place packed with patrons dancing on the tables. The group quit school and hit the road.

KIMN Radio

INDUCTED

September 8, 2012

In Denver, the generation that grew up in the 1950s and 1960s had its worldview formed by KIMN, located at 950 on the AM radio dial. Under the ownership of Ken Palmer, the station became the dominant Top 40 music station in town. Newspapers reported that anywhere a crowd gathered waiting for the Beatles to play Red Rocks on August 26, 1964, all the transistor radios could be heard tuned to KIMN.

Barry Fey

INDUCTED

February 12, 2012

Fresh from Chicago, 27-year-old Barry Fey moved to Denver in early 1967 and began his career as one of rock music's most prolific promoters. After a trip to San Francisco’s Haight Ashbury district, Fey contacted music impresario Chet Helms to discuss bringing a bit of the “Summer of Love” scene back to Denver, and a recently closed nightspot in an industrial stretch of Evans Avenue was turned into the Family Dog.

Harry Tuft

INDUCTED

February 12, 2012

It has been said that every free-thinking musician has at one time made the pilgrimage to Harry Tuft’s Denver Folklore Center to soak up knowledge from the dean of Colorado’s folk scene. Carrying only his guitar and a leather briefcase, Tuft journeyed west from Philadelphia in 1962 to open a small store selling vintage instruments, records, books and other musical paraphernalia on 17th Avenue.

John Denver

INDUCTED

April 21, 2011

John Denver (born Henry John Deutschendorf, Jr. in 1943) received his first major break during an audition for the popular Chad Mitchell Trio. He began writing songs when he was chosen as the group’s new lead singer from over 250 other hopefuls.Meanwhile, other performers were discovering his talents. In 1969, Peter, Paul & Mary, the most popular folk group of that decade, had their first and only No. 1 hit with a cover of Denver’s “Leaving On A Jet Plane.”

Red Rocks Amphitheatre

INDUCTED

April 21, 2011

Nature’s prehistoric upthrust of the Red Rocks area began some 70 to 40 million years ago with a geological event called the Laramide orogeny. Of the numerous formations, sharp-angled Creation Rock is the giant that attracts the most attention, towering 500 feet from its base. To the left, forming what boosters used to call “the Gateway of Heaven and Earth,” is Ship Rock, which at night looks like a gigantic ocean liner.